ASCA Mission Statement on Development

ASCA’s goal is to address the current quality-of-life and climate change issues in our core residential neighborhood by supporting responsible development. The once industrial area of Dorchester Ave. will bring large scale mixed-use development, and this makes it vitally important that we adhere to zoning regulations in our residential area as they greatly impact our community.
We are also conscious of the need to design and develop projects in ways that mitigate the impact of climate change and adapt to future environmental conditions.
WE SUPPORT:
Maintain the modal setback, and if it has been recently changed, we must provide sidewalks large enough for multiple people to pass, baby carriages/wheelchairs to access. Wider sidewalks also allow for all the barrels on trash day AND space to bank snow in the winter. This also provides room to follow Parks & Rec guidelines in hopes of planting more trees. Second-floor overhangs, and bay windows, have been given much liberty over the past several years and should also adhere to modal set-back as they interfere with pedestrians walking experience during inclement weather. For example, if the modal setback is five feet, a project’s second-floor overhang should adhere to the five-foot setback, not the building envelope. And while our older attached buildings do not conform to required side/yard set-backs, we should not continue to follow this pattern set 75 to 100 years ago when they were built. New construction should adhere to setback guidelines for front, rear and side yards.
Provide adequate parking for a neighborhood that has seen a breaking point when it comes to insufficient parking. Strictly enforce the current ratio of 1 parking space per 1 bedroom unit, and more parking spaces if there are multiple bedrooms. We are open to considering alternative parking options, such as parking lifts, for projects to achieve the desired parking ratios.Maintain some historical character and stability in the neighborhood by supporting BPDA/ZBA protocol on height and FAR (floor area requirements). These codes were recently update, with MUCH input from the community, and they should be respected.Regarding open space and trash, it is imperative that projects provide open space as defined by zoning requirements. Personal space (decks/balconies) should not be included in open space calculations. Andrew Square is in a flood zone. We need open/green areas to address: climate change, resiliency and flooding that is already occurring in our neighborhood. Open space is also important to curb dogs, for trash/recycling bins (unless there is plenty of room for these inside a garage). Trash has become a problem in the neighborhood as residents do not have enough receptacles. This has created an on-going problems with rodents.In general, we do not support large roof decks/decks and prefer smaller balconies preferably inserted in building. However we review outdoor space on a case-by-case basis and our support depends upon the circumstances of a proposed project with location and impact on abutting neighbors.With the goal in mind of preparing our community for all aspects of climate change, projects should include features that increase our neighborhood’s resiliency to rising sea levels and flooding (as mentioned in reference to open space), lessen the urban heat island effect, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions through safe walking, biking and public transportation options.Andrew Square has done more than its fair share of increasing the housing stock in Boston. ASCA has worked hard with city agencies over the years to identify areas of significant growth on Dorchester Ave, Old Colony Ave., Anne Lynch homes at Old Colony, and more recently Mary Ellen McCormack Housing Development. It is imperative that we protect our residential neighborhood.We look forward to working with all parties, in particular the ZBA/BPDA, to assist us in our efforts to be intentional and support responsible, sustainable development – the type of development that will promote an equitable and healthy neighborhood.

Information from 2020 Boston Census:
Population Growth:
South Boston had 35,660 residents in 2015, 5% of Boston’s population South Boston grew by 25% from 2000 to 2015, faster than the city’s growth of 10% over the same period.
Vehicles:
70% of South Boston households in 2015 had a least one vehicle, compared to 65% of all Boston households.
The ratio of vehicles to households in South Boston was 1.02 in 2015, higher than Boston’s ratio of 0.91
Pets per household:
While we cannot confirm number of pets per household via 2020 census, suffice it to say there are many households with dog(s).
Data collected from ASCA survey on parking/transportation (December 2020): 65 people responded6 do not have cars – 27 have one car and no parking – 16 have one car and off street parking – 7 have 2 cars no parking - 4 have 2 cars with 1 parking spot – 3 have 2 cars with off street parking for both vehicles – 2 have 3 vehicles with one parking spot
1 bikes to work - 13 take the MBTA to work – 3 retired
6 residents mentioned prior to covid they took the MBTA, but will no longer do so. – 4 residents commented they will no longer use Andrew Station due to safety issues.

By clicking submit; I acknowledge that the Owner(s), Architect(s), and Legal Representative(s) have received AND read the ASCA Mission Statement on Development

ASCA Development Committee RFI

Request To Present Proposed Development In Andrew Square

Before you may submit your RFI, you must read the ASCA Mission Statement on Development. By clicking the submit button you confirm acknowledgement of such.

Proposed plans should adhere to ASCA Mission Statements on Development – which was tailored to address quality of life issues, address City of Boston’s housing/climate concerns, while protecting our core neighborhood from becoming a transient neighborhood

Complete this form and attach your architectural plans in pdf format. (16MB limit)

Community Process

Step 1: On-site Abutters Meeting (if the on-site meeting results in much opposition, we encourage the developer to review feedback and scheduled a follow-up – as direct abutters opinions carry much weight with ASCA/ZBA

Step 2: ASCA MEETING/VOTE: following the presentation there will be a brief discussion, questions and answer period. Developers and those with vested interest in the proposal will be required to leave the meeting during the vote. Notification on results will be sent to developers/elected officials by the next day.

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